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Committee begins review of High Priority Projects list -- your input is needed

FSF - Lun, 12/08/2014 - 23:40

This announcement was written by the FSF's volunteer High Priority Projects Committee.

Nine and a half years ago the first version of the High Priority Free Software Projects (HPP) list debuted with only four projects, three of them related to Java. Eighteen months later, Sun began to free Java users. The current HPP list includes fourteen categories mentioning over forty distinct projects. Computing is ever more ubiquitous and diverse, multiplying challenges to surmount in order for all computer users to be free.

Undoubtedly there are thousands of free software projects that are high priority, each having potential to displace non-free programs for many users, substantially increasing the freedom of those users. But the potential value of a list of High Priority Free Software Projects maintained by the Free Software Foundation is its ability to bring attention to a relatively small number of projects of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. Over the years the list has received praise and criticism -- frankly not nearly enough, given the importance of its aims -- and been rebooted. As the list approaches its tenth year, we aim to revitalize and rethink it, on an ongoing basis.

The first step has been to assemble a committee which will maintain the list, initially composed of the following free software activists: ginger coons, Máirín Duffy, Matthew Garrett, Benjamin Mako Hill, Mike Linksvayer, Lydia Pintscher, Karen Sandler, Seth Schoen, and Stefano Zacchiroli. The committee has drafted this announcement and the following plan.

We need your input! Send your suggestions of projects to hpp-feedback@gnu.org. Remember, we're looking for projects of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. If you wish, we encourage you to publish your thoughts independently (e.g., on your blog) and send a us a link. Keep in mind that not every project of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users will be a software development project. If you believe other forms of activism, internal or external (e.g., making free software communities safe for diverse participants, mandating use of free software in the public sector), are most crucial, please make the case and suggest such a project!

Based on the received input, the current content of the list, and our own contributions, we will publish a substantially revised list and an analysis before LibrePlanet 2015 and expect a lively discussion at that event. If we are successful, we will have the immediate impact of bringing widespread coverage of free software movement strategy and the ongoing impact of garnering substantial attention and new effort for listed projects. (Note that we're also interested in outreach and measurement suggestions. A revised and maintained list is necessary but not sufficient for success.)

Finally, we've already made a few minor changes to the HPP list in order to fix long-standing issues that have been reported in the past. We are looking forward to your feedback at hpp-feedback@gnu.org as we work on more substantial improvements!

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Categorías: Software Libre

Future viewport, the design

Blender - Mar, 12/02/2014 - 17:34

As outlined in the previous post there are some technical and feature targets we want to achieve. Recapping here:

1) Performance boost for drawing code. Make sure we use the best drawing method always to pass data to the GPU/Support features that are only available on new OpenGL that will enable better performance and code.

2) Node based material definition for viewport – and definition of a new real – time material system used for rendering (GLSL renderer).

3) Compositing. Includes things such as outlines, depth of field, ambient occlusion, HDR, bloom, flares.

4) Support mobile devices.

What is the state so far:

* Limited compositing (in viewport_experiments branch). When we say limited we mean that the compositor is not tied up to the interface properly, rather it just applies effects to the whole contents of the framebuffer. What we would want ideally, is to not allow UI indicators, such as wires or bones from affecting compositing. This is not too hard to enforce though and can be done similarly to how the current transparency/Xray system works, by tagging wire objects and adding them to be rendered on top of compositing.

* Some parts of our mesh drawing code use Vertex Buffer Objects in an optimal way, others do but still suffer from performance issues by not doing it right, while others do not use it at all.

How will the soc_2014_viewport_fx branch help achieving the targets?

Soc-2014_viewport_fx is providing a layer that can be used to migrate to newer or mobile versions of OpenGL with less hastle, but also tries to enforce some good rendering practices along the way, such as the requirement in modern versions of OpenGL that everything is rendered through Vertex Buffer Objects. Also it removes GLU from the dependencies (since it uses deprecated OpenGL functionality).

Also it sets in place some initial functionality so things can be drawn using shaders exclusively. This is essential if we move to modern or mobile OpenGL versions at some point.

So it mostly helps with targets 1 and 4, but more work will need to be done after merging to realize those targets fully.

At some point, if we want to support modern or mobile OpenGL, we can’t avoid rewriting a big part of our realtime rendering code. The branch already takes some care of that so the branch should be merged and worked on (merging is the first step really), unless we do not really care about supporting those platforms and features.

My estimation, from personal experiments with manual merging, is that it would take about 2-3 weeks of full time work to bring the branch to master-readiness.

Can we focus on some targets immediately?

Yes we can. Some targets such as node materials or compositing, just assume GLSL support in mesh drawing which is yet to be realized in the branch fully so it’s not really blocking their progress. However, getting the branch in as soon as possible will mean less headaches during the merge.

Viewport usability design

Draw modes

Draw modes are getting a little bit unpredictable as to what they enable and are more tied to a real time material definition limited to specular/diffuse/textured. They are also bound to the texture face data structure which is becoming less relevant since we are slowly moving to a material based approach. Often artists have to tweak a number of material and object options to get the visual feedback they need, which can also be frustrating and it is not apparent to new users either. We need a design which allows artists to easily work on a particular workflow while being able to visualize what they want without extensive guesswork of how to visualize this best. Ideally we want to drop draw modes in favour of…

Workflow modes (model, sculpt, paint, animation, game shader design)

Different workflows require different data, and different visualizations. So we can define ‘workflow modes’, which includes a set of shaders and visualization options authored specifically for the current workflow. For instance, a ‘workbench’ mode in edit mode will have a basic diffuse and specular shader with wireframe display options. For retopology, it would make sense to use more minimal, transparent mesh display, like hidden wire, with depth offsetting to avoid intersection artifacts.

Example image of edit mode display options. Some options exist to aid in specific workflows, but this is not so readily apparent

For material definition or texture painting, users might want the full final result or an unshaded version of it for detail tweaking.

Debugging (logic, rigging, etc)

Drawing can offer visual feedback to make it easier for users to examine problematic areas in their scenes. Examples include order of dependency calculation or color-encoded vertex and face counts, or even debug options available to developers.


Easy to switch from one to another, easy to config or script

Using the workflow system, users should be able to get their display to be more predictable. Each workflow mode can expose settings for the shaders or passes used but we can allow more customization than this. A node interface will allow users to request data from blender and write their own shaders to process and visualize these data in their own way. We will follow the OSL paradigm with a dedicated node that will request data from blender in the form of data attribute inputs connected to the node. The data request system is at the heart of the new data streaming design and this means that materials and custom shaders should be able to request such data. Probably even access to real time compositing will be included, though memory consumption is a concern here, and we need to better define how data will be requested in that case.


Modernize! Assume that users will always want the best, most realistic, etc.

With the capabilities modern real time shading offers, we aim to add a third render engine using OpenGL, (next to internal and cycles) which can leverage the capabilities of modern GPUs and tailored to make real time rendering a real alternative for final rendering in blender. A lot of the components are already there, but we can push it further, with shader implementations optimized especially for real time rendering instead of trying to mimic an off-line renderer.

We want to make sure that our material display is pleasing, so we are exploring more modern rendering methods such as physically based shading (a patch by Clement Foucault using notes from Unreal Engine 4 is already considered for inclusion) and deferred rendering.

Needless to say this will also mean improved preview of materials for blender internal and cycles.

Categorías: Diseño 3D

Software Freedom Conservancy and Free Software Foundation announce copyleft.org

FSF - Vie, 11/07/2014 - 17:12

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Friday, November 7, 2014 -- Software Freedom Conservancy and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announce an ongoing public project that began in early 2014: Copyleft and the GNU General Public License: A Comprehensive Tutorial and Guide, and the publication of that project in its new home on the Internet at copyleft.org. This new site will not only provide a venue for those who constantly update and improve the Comprehensive Tutorial, but is also now home to a collaborative community to share and improve information about copyleft licenses, especially the GNU General Public License (GPL), and best compliance practices.

Bradley M. Kuhn, President and Distinguished Technologist of Software Freedom Conservancy and member of FSF's Board of Directors, currently serves as editor-in-chief of the project. The text has already grown to 100 pages discussing all aspects of copyleft -- including policy motivations, detailed study of the license texts, and compliance issues. This tutorial was initially constructed from materials that Kuhn developed on a semi-regular basis over the last eleven years. Kuhn merged this material, along with other material regarding the GPL published by the FSF, into a single, coherent volume, and released it publicly for the benefit of all users of free software.

Today, Conservancy announces a specific, new contribution: an additional chapter to the Case Studies in GPL Enforcement section of the tutorial. This new chapter, co-written by Kuhn and Conservancy's compliance engineer, Denver Gingrich, discusses in detail the analysis of a complete, corresponding source (CCS) release for a real-world electronics product, and describes the process that Conservancy and the FSF use to determine whether a CCS candidate complies with the requirements of the GPL. The CCS analyzed is for ThinkPenguin's TPE-NWIFIROUTER wireless router, which the FSF recently awarded Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification.

The copyleft guide itself is distributed under the terms of a free copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. Kuhn, who hopes the initial release and this subsequent announcement will inspire others to contribute to the text, said, "information about copyleft -- such as why it exists, how it works, and how to comply -- should be freely available and modifiable, just as all generally useful technical information should. I am delighted to impart my experience with copyleft freely. I hope, however, that other key thinkers in the field of copyleft will contribute to help produce the best reference documentation on copyleft available."

Particularly useful are the substantial contributions already made to the guide from the FSF itself. As the author, primary interpreter, and ultimate authority on the GPL, the FSF is in a unique position to provide insights into understanding free software licensing. While the guide as a living text will not automatically reflect official FSF positions, the FSF has already approved and published one version for use at its Seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics in March 2014. "Participants at our licensing seminar in March commented positively on the high quality of the teaching materials, including the comprehensive guide to GPL compliance. We look forward to collaborating with the copyleft.org community to continually improve this resource, and we will periodically review particular versions for FSF endorsement and publication," said FSF's executive director John Sullivan.

Enthusiastic new contributors can get immediately involved by visiting and editing the main wiki on copyleft.org, or by submitting merge requests on copyleft.org's gitorious site for the guide, or by joining the project mailing list and IRC channel.

copyleft.org welcomes all contributors. The editors have already incorporated other freely licensed documents about GPL and compliance with copyleft licenses -- thus providing a central location for all such works. Furthermore, the project continues to recruit contributors who have knowledge about other copyleft licenses besides the FSF's GPL family. In particular, Mike Linksvayer, member of Conservancy's board of directors, has agreed to lead the drafting on a section about Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike licenses to mirror the ample text already available on GPL. "I'm glad to bring my knowledge about the Creative Commons copyleft licenses as a contribution to improve further this excellent tutorial text, and I hope that copyleft.org as a whole can more generally become a central location to collect interesting ideas about copyleft policy," said Linksvayer.

About copyleft.org

copyleft.org is a collaborative project to create and disseminate useful information, tutorial material, and new policy ideas regarding all forms of copyleft licensing. Its primary project is currently a comprehensive tutorial and guide, which describes the policy motivations of copyleft licensing, presents a detailed analysis of the text of various copyleft licenses, and gives examples and case studies of copyleft compliance situations.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

About Software Freedom Conservancy

Software Freedom Conservancy is a not-for-profit organization that promotes, improves, develops and defends Free, Libre and Open Source software projects. Conservancy is home to more than thirty software projects, each supported by a dedicated community of volunteers, developers and users. Conservancy's projects include some of the most widely used software systems in the world across many application areas, including educational software deployed in schools around the globe, embedded software systems deployed in most consumer electronic devices, distributed version control developer tools, integrated library services systems, and widely used graphics and art programs. A full list of Conservancy's member projects is available. Conservancy provides these projects with the necessary infrastructure and not-for-profit support services to enable each project's communities to focus on what they do best: creating innovative software and advancing computing for the public's benefit.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Karen M. Sandler
Executive Director
Software Freedom Conservancy
+1 (212) 461-3245
info@sfconservancy.org

Categorías: Software Libre

The Free Software Foundation opens nominations for the 17th annual Free Software Awards

FSF - Vie, 10/17/2014 - 19:05
Award for the Advancement of Free Software

The Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software is presented annually by FSF president Richard Stallman to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

Individuals who describe their projects as "open" instead of "free" are eligible nonetheless, provided the software is in fact free/libre.

Last year, Matthew Garrett was recognized with the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for his work to keep "Secure Boot" free software compatible, as well as his other work to make sure that so-called security measures do not come at the expense of user freedom. Garrett joined a prestigious list of previous winners including Dr. Fernando Perez, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Rob Savoye, John Gilmore, Wietse Venema, Harald Welte, Ted Ts'o, Andrew Tridgell, Theo de Raadt, Alan Cox, Larry Lessig, Guido van Rossum, Brian Paul, Miguel de Icaza, and Larry Wall.

Award for Projects of Social Benefit

Nominations are also open for the 2014 Award for Projects of Social Benefit.

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to the project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life.

We look to recognize projects or teams that encourage people to cooperate in freedom to accomplish social tasks. A long-term commitment to one's project (or the potential for a long-term commitment) is crucial to this end.

This award stresses the use of free software in the service of humanity. We have deliberately chosen this broad criterion so that many different areas of activity can be considered. However, one area that is not included is that of free software itself. Projects with a primary goal of promoting or advancing free software are not eligible for this award (we honor individuals working on those projects with our annual Award for the Advancement of Free Software).

We will consider any project or team that uses free software or its philosophy to address a goal important to society. To qualify, a project must use free software, produce free documentation, or use the idea of free software as defined in the Free Software Definition. Projects that promote or depend on the use of non-free software are not eligible for this award. Commercial projects are not excluded, but commercial success is not our scale for judging projects.

Last year, the GNOME Foundation's Outreach Program for Women (OPW) received the award, in recognition of its work to involve women (cis and trans) and genderqueer people in free software development. OPW's work benefits society more broadly, addressing gender discrimination by empowering women to develop leadership and development skills in a society which runs on technology. OPW does this critical work using the ideals and collaborative culture of the free software movement.

Other previous winners have included OpenMRS, GNU Health, Tor, the Internet Archive, Creative Commons, Groklaw, the Sahana project, and Wikipedia.

Eligibility

In the case of both awards, previous winners are not eligible for nomination, but renomination of other previous nominees is encouraged. Only individuals are eligible for nomination for the Advancement of Free Software Award (not projects), and only projects can be nominated for the Social Benefit Award (not individuals). For a list of previous winners, please visit https://www.fsf.org/awards.

Current FSF staff and board members, as well as award committee members, are not eligible.

The tentative award committee members are: Marina Zhurakhinskaya, Matthew Garrett, Rob Savoye, Wietse Venema, Richard Stallman, Suresh Ramasubramanian, Vernor Vinge, Hong Feng, Fernanda G. Weiden, Harald Welte, Vernor Vinge, Jonas Oberg, and Yukihiro Matsumoto.

Instructions

After reviewing the eligibility rules above, please send your nominations to award-nominations@gnu.org, on or before Sunday, November 16th, 2014 at 23:59 UTC. Please submit nominations in the following format:

  • In the email message subject line, either put the name of the person you are nominating for the Award for Advancement of Free Software, or put the name of the project for the Award for Projects of Social Benefit.

  • Please include, in the body of your message, an explanation (forty lines or less) of the work done and why you think it is especially important to the advancement of software freedom or how it benefits society, respectively.

  • Please state, in the body of your message, where to find the materials (e.g., software, manuals, or writing) which your nomination is based on.

Information about the previous awards can be found at https://www.fsf.org/awards. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony at the LibrePlanet conference, March 21-22 2015, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Categorías: Software Libre

Matthew Garrett joins Free Software Foundation board of directors

FSF - Jue, 10/16/2014 - 23:39

He becomes the eighth director on the FSF's board. The full list of their names and biographies can be found at http://www.fsf.org/about/staff-and-board.

"Matthew Garrett is a truly committed defender of users' freedom. The FSF is fortunate to have him on the board of directors," said FSF president Richard M. Stallman.

A developer specializing in the interactions between operating system kernels, platform firmware and system security, much of Garrett's work has focused on mechanisms for avoiding the oft-suggested tradeoff between user security and user freedom, ensuring that users have ultimate control over which software their devices will and will not run.

FSF executive director John Sullivan said, "Matthew has generously donated his time and expertise to advise the FSF on many issues in recent years, especially Restricted Boot and other disconcerting trends at the intersection of hardware and proprietary software distribution. His willingness to increase his involvement in FSF technical and policy leadership is fantastic news for our members and supporters."

Earlier this year, Garrett won the Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software. He holds a PhD in genetics from the University of Cambridge, and presents frequently around the world on the topic of free software in wider society.

On accepting the invitation to join the board, Garrett said, "It's been almost thirty years since the Free Software Foundation was founded, and in that time free software has become an indispensable part of computer use everywhere, creating an entire new generation of users and developers for whom free software has always been ubiquitous. Unfortunately, the number of threats to user freedom has also increased over that time. The FSF continues to campaign against attempts to restrict the rights of users and developers to be in ultimate control of the software that they use and the devices that they own, and I'm proud to be able to be a part of that."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

The above image is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 by nekonoir on Flickr.

Categorías: Software Libre

[20140904] - Core - Denial of Service

Joomla Security - Mar, 09/30/2014 - 21:00
  • Project: Joomla!
  • SubProject: CMS
  • Severity: Low
  • Versions: 2.5.4 through 2.5.25, 3.2.5 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.4
  • Exploit type: Denial of Service
  • Reported Date: 2014-September-24
  • Fixed Date: 2014-September-30
  • CVE Number: CVE-2014-7229
Description

Inadequate checking allowed the potential for a denial of service attack.

Affected Installs

Joomla! CMS versions 2.5.4 through 2.5.25, 3.2.5 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.4

Solution

Upgrade to version 2.5.26, 3.2.6, or 3.3.5

Contact

The JSST at the Joomla! Security Center.

Reported By: Johannes Dahse
Categorías: Joomla

[20140903] - Core - Remote File Inclusion

Joomla Security - Mar, 09/30/2014 - 21:00
  • Project: Joomla!
  • SubProject: CMS
  • Severity: Moderate
  • Versions: 2.5.4 through 2.5.25, 3.2.5 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.4
  • Exploit type: Remote File Inclusion
  • Reported Date: 2014-September-24
  • Fixed Date: 2014-September-30
  • CVE Number: CVE-2014-7228
Description

Inadequate checking allowed the potential for remote files to be executed.

Affected Installs

Joomla! CMS versions 2.5.4 through 2.5.25, 3.2.5 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.4

Solution

Upgrade to version 2.5.26, 3.2.6, or 3.3.5

Additional Details

Please refer to AkeebaBackup.com for additional details.

Contact

The JSST at the Joomla! Security Center.

Reported By: Johannes Dahse
Categorías: Joomla

Free Software Foundation statement on the GNU Bash "shellshock" vulnerability

FSF - Jue, 09/25/2014 - 23:35

Bash is the GNU Project's shell; it is part of the suite of software that makes up the GNU operating system. The GNU programs plus the kernel Linux form a commonly used complete free software operating system, called GNU/Linux. The bug, which is being referred to as "shellshock," can allow, in some circumstances, attackers to remotely access and control systems using Bash (and programs that call Bash) as an attack vector, regardless of what kernel they are running. The bug probably affects many GNU/Linux users, along with those using Bash on proprietary operating systems like Apple's OS X and Microsoft Windows. Additional technical details about the issue can be found at CVE-2014-6271 and CVE-2014-7169.

GNU Bash has been widely adopted because it is a free (as in freedom), reliable, and featureful shell. This popularity means the serious bug that was published yesterday is just as widespread. Fortunately, GNU Bash's license, the GNU General Public License version 3, has facilitated a rapid response. It allowed Red Hat to develop and share patches in conjunction with Bash upstream developers efforts to fix the bug, which anyone can download and apply themselves. Everyone using Bash has the freedom to download, inspect, and modify the code -- unlike with Microsoft, Apple, or other proprietary software.

Software freedom is a precondition for secure computing; it guarantees everyone the ability to examine the code to detect vulnerabilities, and to create new and safe versions if a vulnerability is discovered. Your software freedom does not guarantee bug-free code, and neither does proprietary software: bugs happen no matter how the software is licensed. But when a bug is discovered in free software, everyone has the permission, rights, and source code to expose and fix the problem. That fix can then be immediately freely distributed to everyone who needs it. Thus, these freedoms are crucial for ethical, secure computing.

Proprietary, (aka nonfree) software relies on an unjust development model that denies users the basic freedom to control their computers. When software's code is kept hidden, it is vulnerable not only to bugs that go undetected, but to the easier deliberate addition and maintenance of malicious features. Companies can use the obscurity of their code to hide serious problems, and it has been documented that Microsoft provides intelligence agencies with information about security vulnerabilities before fixing them.

Free software cannot guarantee your security, and in certain situations may appear less secure on specific vectors than some proprietary programs. As was widely agreed in the aftermath of the OpenSSL "Heartbleed" bug, the solution is not to trade one security bug for the very deep insecurity inherently created by proprietary software -- the solution is to put energy and resources into auditing and improving free programs.

Development of Bash, and GNU in general, is almost exclusively a volunteer effort, and you can contribute. We are reviewing Bash development, to see if increased funding can help prevent future problems. If you or your organization use Bash and are potentially interested in supporting its development, please contact us.

The patches to fix this issue can be obtained directly at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bash/.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Categorías: Software Libre

[20140901] - Core - XSS Vulnerability

Joomla Security - Mar, 09/23/2014 - 21:00
  • Project: Joomla!
  • SubProject: CMS
  • Severity: Moderate
  • Versions: 3.2.0 through 3.2.4, 3.3.0 through 3.3.3
  • Exploit type: XSS Vulnerability
  • Reported Date: 2014-August-27
  • Fixed Date: 2014-September-23
  • CVE Number: CVE-2014-6631
Description

Inadequate escaping leads to XSS vulnerability in com_media.

Affected Installs

Joomla! CMS versions 3.2.0 through 3.2.4 and 3.3.0 through 3.3.3

Solution

Upgrade to version 3.2.5 or 3.3.4

Contact

The JSST at the Joomla! Security Center.

Reported By: Dingjie (Daniel) Yang
Categorías: Joomla

[20140902] - Core - Unauthorised Logins

Joomla Security - Mar, 09/23/2014 - 21:00
  • Project: Joomla!
  • SubProject: CMS
  • Severity: Moderate
  • Versions: 2.5.24 and earlier 2.5.x versions, 3.2.4 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.3
  • Exploit type: Unauthorised Logins
  • Reported Date: 2014-September-09
  • Fixed Date: 2014-September-23
  • CVE Number: CVE-2014-6632
Description

Inadequate checking allowed unauthorised logins via LDAP authentication.

Affected Installs

Joomla! CMS versions 2.5.24 and earlier 2.5.x versions, 3.2.4 and earlier 3.x versions, 3.3.0 through 3.3.3

Solution

Upgrade to version 2.5.25, 3.2.5, or 3.3.4

Contact

The JSST at the Joomla! Security Center.

Reported By: Matthew Daley
Categorías: Joomla

Viewport project – targets, current state of the code

Blender - Lun, 09/22/2014 - 13:52

Depth of field in progress

Encompassing a broad issue with decentralized code such as real time drawing under the umbrella of the “Viewport” project, might be slightly misleading. The viewport project, essentially encapsulates a few technical and artistic targets such as:

  • Performance improvement in viewport drawing, allowing greater vertex counts
  • Shader driven drawing – custom/user driven or automatic for both internal materials and postprocessing in viewport (includes eye candy targets such as HDR viewport, lens flares, PBR shaders, depth of field)
  • Portability of drawing code – this should allow us to switch with as little pain as possible to future APIs and devices such as OpenGLES compatible devices

These targets include code that has already been written as part of blender, as part of the viewport GSOC projects by Jason Wilkins, and will also require more code and a few decisions on our part to make them work. One of those decisions is about the version of OpenGL that will be required for blender from now on. First, we should note that OpenGL ES 2.0 for mobile devices is a good target to develop for, when we support mobile devices in the future, given those stats. OpenGL ES 2.0 means, roughly, that we need programmable shading everywhere – fixed function pipeline does not exist in that API. Also, using programmable shading only will allow us to easily upgrade to a pure OpenGL 3.0+ core profile if/when we need to, since modern OpenGL also has no fixed pipeline anymore. For non-technical readers, OpenGL 3.0+ has two profiles, “compatibility” and “core”. While compatibility is backwards compatible with previous versions of OpenGL, core profile throws out a lot of deprecated API functionality and vendors can enable more optimizations in those profiles, since they do not need to take care of breaking compatibility with older features. Upgrading is not really required, since we can already use an OpenGL 3.0+ compatibility profile in most OS’s (with the exception of OSX), and OpenGL extensions allow us to use most features of modern OpenGL. Upgrading to core 3.0 would only enforce us to use certain coding paradigms in OpenGL that are guaranteed to be “good practice”, since deprecated functionality does not exist there. Note though, that those paradigms can be enforced now (for instance, by using preprocessor directives to prohibit use of the deprecated functions, as done in the viewport GSOC branch), using OpenGL 2.1. So let’s explore a few of those targets, explaining ways to achieve them:

  • Performance:

This is the most deceptive target. Performance is not just a matter of upgrading to a better version of OpenGL (or to another API such as Direct X, as has been suggested in the past). Rather, it is a combination of using best practices when drawing, which are not being followed everywhere currently, and using the right API functions. In blender code we can benefit from:

  1. Avoid CPU overhead. This is the most important issue in blender. Various drawing paths check every face/edge state that is sent to the GPU before sending them. Such checks should be cached and invalidated properly. This alone should make drawing of GLSL and textured meshes much faster. This requires rethinking our model of derivedmesh drawing. Current model uses polymorphic functions in our derived meshes to control drawing. Instead, drawing functions should be attached to the material types available for drawing instead and derived meshes should have a way to provide materials with the requested data buffers for drawing. A change that will drastically improve the situation for textured drawing is redesigning the way we handle texture images per face. The difficulty here is that every face can potentially have a different image assigned, so we cannot make optimizing assumptions easily. To support this, our current code loops over all mesh faces every frame -regardless of whether the display data have changed or not- and checks every face for images. This is also relevant to minimizing state changes – see below.
  2. Minimize state changes between materials and images. If we move to a shader driven pipeline this will be important, since changing between shaders incurs more overhead than simply changing numerical values of default phong materials.
  3. Only re-upload data that need re-uploading. Currently, blender uploads all vertex data to the GPU when a change occurs. It should be possible to update only a portion of that data. E.g, editing UVs only updates UV data, if modifiers on a mesh are deform type only, update only vertices etc. This is hard to do currently because derivedmeshes are completely freed on mesh update, and GPU data reside on the derivedmesh.
  4. Use modern features to accelerate drawing. This surely includes instancing APIs in OpenGL (attribute, or uniform based) – which can only be done if we use shaders. Direct state access APIs and memory mapping, can help eliminate driver overhead. Uniform buffer objects are a great way to pass data across shaders without rebinding uniforms and attributes per shader, however they require shading language written explicitly for OpenGL 3.0+. Transform feedback can help avoiding vertex streaming overhead in edit mode drawing, where we redraw the same mesh multiple times. Note that most of those are pretty straightforward and trivial to plug in, once the core that handles shader-based, batch-driven drawing has been implemented.
  • Shader Driven Drawing

The main challenge here is the combinatorial explosion of shaders (ie shader uses lighting or not, uses texturing or not, is dynamically generated from nodes etc,etc). Ideally we want to avoid switching shaders as much as possible. This can be trivially accomplished by drawing per material as explained above. We could probably implement a hashing scheme where materials that share the same hash also share the same shader, however this would incur its own overhead. Combinations are not only generated by different material options, but also from various options that are used in painting, editors, objects, even user preferences. The aspect system in the works in the GSOC viewport branch attempts to tackle the issue by using predefined materials for most of blender’s drawing, where of course we use parameters to tweak the shaders. Shader driven materials open the door to other intersting things, such as GPU instancing, and even deferred rendering. For the latter we do some experiments already in the viewport_experiments branch. For some compositing effects, we can reconstruct the world space position and normals even now using a depth buffer, but this is expensive. Using a multi-render target approach here will help with performance but again, this needs shader support. For starters though we can support a minimum set of ready-made effects for viewport compositing. Allowing full blown user compositing or shading requires having the aforementioned material system where materials or effects can request mesh data appropriately. Shader driven drawing is of course important for real time node-driven GLSL materials and PBR shaders too. These systems need a good tool design still, maybe even a blender internal material system redesign, which would be much more long term if we do it. Some users have proposed a separate visualization system than the renderers themselves. How it all fits together and what expectations it creates is still an open issue – will users expect to get the viewport result during rendering, or do we allow certain shader-only real time eye candy, with a separate real time workflow?

Screen Space Ambient Occlusion shader on a sculpted mesh

  • Portability

Being able to support multiple platforms – in other words multiple OpenGL versions or even graphics APIs – means that we need a layer that handles all GPU operations and allows no explicit OpenGL in the rest of the code, allowing us to basically replace the GPU implementation under blender transparently. This has already been handled in the GSOC viewport 2013 branch (the 2014 branch is just the bare API at the moment, not hooked into the rest of blender), with code that takes care of disallowing OpenGL functions outside the gpu module. That will mean GLES and mobile device support support, which is something Alexandr Kuznetsov has worked on and demostrated a few years back.

  • Conclusion

As can be seen some of those targets can be accomplished by adjusting the current system, while other targets are more ambitious and long term. For gooseberry, our needs are mode urgent than the long term deliverables of the viewport project, so we will probably focus on a few pathological cases of drawing and a basic framework for compositing (which cannot really be complete until we have a full shader-driven pipeline). However in collaboration with Jason and Alexandr we hope to finish and merge the code that will make those improvements possible on a bigger scale.

Categorías: Diseño 3D

LibrePlanet is coming March 21-22, 2015, call for proposals now open for annual free software conference

FSF - Mar, 09/16/2014 - 21:56

LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts. The conference brings together software developers, policy experts, activists and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments and face challenges to software freedom. Newcomers are always welcome, and LibrePlanet 2015 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.

This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "Free Software Everywhere." The call for sessions seeks talks that touch on the many places and ways that free software is used around the world, as well as ways to make free software ubiquitous. Proposals are encouraged to consider "everywhere" in the broadest sense of the word. LibrePlanet 2015 will take software freedom around the world, to outer space, and consider its role in industry, government, academia, community organizing, and personal computing.

"LibrePlanet is one of the most rewarding things we do all year. This conference brings people from all over the planet who want to make the world a better place with free software," said John Sullivan, executive director of the FSF.

Call for Sessions

"I hope we'll receive session proposals from people with all levels of speaking and technical experience; you don't have to be a coder to speak at LibrePlanet. Free software users, activists, academics, policymakers, developers, and others are all key contributors to the free software movement, and we want to showcase all of these skills at LibrePlanet 2015," said Libby Reinish, a campaigns manager at the FSF.

Call for sessions applications are currently being accepted at https://www.libreplanet.org/2015/call_for_sessions and are due by Sunday, November 2nd, 2014 at 19:59 EST (23:59 UTC).**

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation, and is co-produced by the Student Information Processing Board. What was once a small gathering of FSF members has grown into a larger event for anyone with an interest in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet is always gratis for associate members of the FSF. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2015, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2015.

LibrePlanet 2014 was held at MIT from March 22-23, 2014. Over 350 attendees from all over the world came together for conversations, demonstrations, and keynotes centered around the theme of "Free Software, Free Society." You can watch videos from past conferences at http://media.libreplanet.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 - 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

###

Categorías: Software Libre

ThinkPenguin wireless router now FSF-certified to respect your freedom

FSF - Vie, 09/12/2014 - 23:45

The TPE-NWIFIROUTER comes pre-installed with libreCMC, an FSF-endorsed embedded GNU/Linux distribution.

"This is a big step forward for computer user freedom. For the first time, you can purchase a router that ships with only free software preinstalled. This router and OS give us a platform that we can trust and control, and that the community can use to begin building our own, free software based network for communication, file sharing, social networking, and more," said FSF's executive director John Sullivan.

This is the third product by ThinkPenguin to be awarded the use of the RYF certification mark. The first two were the TPE-N150USB Wireless N USB Adapter and the long-range TPE-N150USBL model.

Christopher Waid, ThinkPenguin's founder and CEO, said, "ThinkPenguin, Inc. was founded with the goal of making free software more easily adoptable by the masses. Everyone needs a wireless router in their homes, and so I am very proud that we are able to offer users a router that ships with 100% free software installed and that is backed by a reputable certification process provided by the FSF."

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom hardware certification, including details on the certification of the TPE-N150USB Wireless N USB adapter, as well as information on the driver and firmware for the device, visit http://www.fsf.org/ryf. Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult http://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

Subscribers to the FSF's Free Software Supporter newsletter will receive announcements about future Respects Your Freedom products.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About ThinkPenguin, Inc

Started by Christopher Waid, founder and CEO, ThinkPenguin, Inc. is a consumer-driven company with a mission to bring free software to the masses. At the core of company is a catalog of computers and accessories with broad support for GNU/Linux. The company provides technical support for end-users and works with the community, distributions, and upstream projects to make GNU/Linux all that it can be.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Media Inquires
ThinkPenguin, Inc.
+1 (888) 39 THINK (84465) x703
media@thinkpenguin.com

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Categorías: Software Libre

Free Software Foundation statement on the new iPhone, Apple Pay, and Apple Watch

FSF - Mar, 09/09/2014 - 20:27

Today, Apple announced new iPhone models, a watch, and a payment service. In response, FSF executive director John Sullivan made the following statement:

It is astonishing to see so much of the technology press acting as Apple's marketing arm. What's on display today is widespread complicity in hiding the most newsworthy aspect of the announcement -- Apple's continuing war on individual computer user freedom, and by extension, free speech, free commerce, free association, privacy, and technological innovation.

Every review that does not mention Apple's insistence on using Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to lock down the devices and applications they sell is doing an extreme disservice to readers, and is a blow to the development of the free digital society we actually need. Any review that discusses technical specs without first exposing the unethical framework that produced those products, is helping usher people down a path that ends in complete digital disempowerment.

Keep a tally of how many reviews you read today mention that Apple threatens anyone who dares attempt installing another operating system like Android on their Apple phone or watch with criminal prosecution under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Keep a tally of how many reviews mention that Apple devices won't allow you to install any unapproved applications, again threatening you with jail time if you attempt to do so without Apple's blessing. Keep a tally of how many reviews highlight Apple's use of software patents and an army of lawyers to attack those developing a more free computing environment than theirs.

We've seen several examples since the last Apple product announcement of times when smartphones and other computers have been used for political activism and important free speech. We've also seen several examples of times when such expressions have been censored. If we continue allowing Apple this kind of control, censorship and digital "free speech zones" will become the permanent norm.

There is a reason that the inventor of the personal computer shuns Apple devices as antithetical to vital kinds of creativity. But it's not enough to just say "Don't buy their products." The laws Apple and others use to enforce their digital restrictions, giving them a subsidized competitive advantage over products that respect user freedom, must be repealed.

At least the watch did end up having a clasp so you can remove it -- we were worried.

We urge users to investigate ways to support the use of mobile and wearable devices which do not restrict users' essential freedoms. Such projects include Replicant, a free software fork of Android, and F-Droid, an app repository of exclusively free software for Android. People should also let Tim Cook at Apple know how they feel.

Categorías: Software Libre

Hair System Roadmap

Blender - Lun, 09/08/2014 - 18:06

The Blender hair system will get a number of improvements for the Gooseberry project. Especially the hair dynamics have to be improved and integrated better into the set of artistic tools to allow animators to control and tweak the hair system efficiently. We have a number of goals that should make hair modelling and simulation into a more flexible and helpful tool.

Solver Stability

Animation tools for hair are quite useless without a stable physical solver. Especially for long hairs a physical solver is a valuable tool for generating believable motion. The solver for the simulation has to be very stable, meaning that it produces correct values (no “explosions”) and does not introduce additional motion due to numerical errors (jiggling).

The current solver for the hair dynamics has a number of issues, resulting from conflicts in the mixed cloth/hair model, questionable assumptions in the force model and plain bugs. To avoid these issues the numerical solver implementation will be replaced by a modified Eigen-based solver. Eigen is a library for linear algebra that is already used in Blender and provides a lot of optimizations that would be hard to introduce otherwise.

Numerical Solver Overview (since this is a code blog)

The physical model for hair systems defines each hair as a series of points, connected by “springs”. In addition there are a couple of external influences that have to be accounted for. The physical equations boil down to calculating changes in positions and velocities of these points.

Our solver then has the task of calculating these Δx and Δv so that the result is as close as possible to the actual value. As a first-order approximation and using sensible force models the differential equations can be expressed as a linear system A·Δv = b (See the References section for in-depth information). The algorithm of choice for solving this system is the Conjugate Gradient method. The Eigen library provides a nice set of CG algorithms already.

Unfortunately, for a constrained system such as a hair structure with “pinned” hair root points as well as collision contacts (see below) the basic CG solver is not enough. We need to extend the method somewhat to take constraints into account and limit the degrees-of-freedom in the solution selectively. The paper by Baraff/Witkin describes this modification in detail.

Hair Volume and Friction

Hair and fur coats need a number of features that notoriously difficult to model in a hair simulation: Volume and Friction. “Volume” is the phenomenon where a lot of hairs closely together will push each other away and leave empty space between them (especially curly hair). “Friction” is what makes entangled hair so difficult to comb, because hairs stick together and have lots of surface area.

Both these effects could be naively modeled by hair-hair collisions, but this is prohibitively expensive due to the potential number of collision pairs. A more economical approach is to model the cumulative effect of hairs using a voxel grid. This feature has already been implemented.

Collisions

Collisions are essential for believable simulation results, but so far don’t exist in for hair simulation in Blender (only a volume-based friction model which is a poor replacement).

The first stage in collision handling is to actually detect intersection of hair segments with meshes. This is done in two distinct phases to speed up the process:

  • Broadphase: The hair segment is tested against the bounding boxes of eligible colliders to narrow down the number of pairs. Acceleration structures can speed up the process of finding overlapping pairs.
  • Nearphase: The potential intersection pairs are tested for actual intersection of the detailed geometry.

The detection of collision pairs is currently handled by a BVH tree based structure. In the future it may become advisable to use the Bullet collision detection for finding such pairs, since it has a lot better optimizations for complicated intersection tests and broadphase filtering.

The second stage is to actually make a hair particle react to a collision, so that the hair is prevented from entering the mesh object. A simple approach is to generate a repulsion force which pushes outward from the mesh. However, this force can cause a lot of unwanted motion. The effect is that a hair particle can not stably come to rest on a surface or even the simulation can “explode” when a particle gets trapped in a collider cavity and it’s velocity increases exponentially from repeated collision responses.

A much more elegant and stable approach to handling collision response is to define the contact between a hair and a mesh as a “constraint”: When the hair collides with a surface it’s motion becomes restricted in the direction of the surface normal (while moving tangentially is still possible and desired to relax internal spring forces). An implicit solver can be modified so that collision constraints are taken into account and jittering effects as well as spring instability is largely avoided.

Physics Settings

Settings in the hair dynamics panel need reorganization to be more intuitive and allow easier tweaking. Naming there is currently misleading and as a consequence artists seem to tend to overconstrain the hair system by steadily increasing forces, until eventually the solver gives up and the simulation “explodes”.

The suggested changes would group the dynamics settings into four categories:

  1. Internal Forces: Structural features of the hairs in general (Bending, Stretching, Damping)
  2. Interaction: Friction and Volume Pressure settings, caused by concentrations of hair in the same space
  3. Collision: Bounciness (restitution) and friction of the hair
  4. External Forces: Effect of various force field types on the hair system

To avoid the problem of counterbalancing forces this ordering should suggest a sensible workflow. Starting with the internal forces results in natural behavior of individual hairs. Setting up friction and damping effects secondarily should help avoid the problem of masking extreme forces by equally strong damping, which creates an “explosive” setup that is hard to control.

Each of the categories can be disabled on its own. This also helps to fix issues with either of the influences in case something goes wrong. Otherwise the only way to test the hair dynamics settings is to reset them to zero individually.

Presets could be another simple but effective way to facilitate tweaking. A fine-tuned group of settings can then be stored for later use or to generate variants from.

Guide Hairs

Editing parent hairs on Koro

Physical simulation is only one tool among many in 3D animation production. A major goal for the hair system is to improve tools for artists and combine classic keyframe animation with simulation. The current workflow of the particle hairs gives animators very little control over the simulation beyond the initial setup phase (“grooming”). The results of a simulation never turn out exactly as desired, and so it is very important that animators be able to define corrections to simulation results.

An important concept for simulation control is the rest position of hairs, i.e. the “natural” shape and orientation a hair will be attracted to by the internal bending forces and additional (non-physical) goal spring forces. This rest position is currently defined as a single shape. Defining keyframes for particle system/hair is a clumsy process with a lot of overhead and far from a usable tool. After baking the entire simulation artists can also modify the point cache data, treating the motion of each hair point as a curve, but this is also limited and doesn’t scale well to large hair systems.

Guide Hairs would solve the problem of keyframing the hair rest positions. They are the primary data structure that animators work with, using sculpting/grooming tools and keyframes if necessary. They are roughly equivalent to the current base hair system, although for clarity renaming them is a good idea.

Simulation Hairs form the second data layer in the hair system. They are initially generated from the guide hairs (which also form the sim hairs’ natural rest position). We have to decide how to display and distinguish these layers in the viewport, but it should be clear to artists that these are separate concepts.

Note that there could actually be more simulation hairs than guide hairs! This is an important feature which allows animators to work on a small set of hairs (easy to set up and control), while having more detail in simulations such as colliding with small objects. Generating simulation hairs can use the same interpolation approach as current child hairs.

Render Hairs are the current “child” hairs. They are not stored as permanent data and don’t carry state information of their own. Their purpose is only to generate sufficient visual detail for renderers. Render hairs can incorporate quite a few shaping features of their own, such as randomness, curling or tapering.

Further Reading

“Large Steps in Cloth Simulation” (Baraff/Witkin 1998): Extensive paper on the use of a modified Conjugate Gradient solver for cloth systems, including useful chapters on force derivations, constraints and collisions.

“Simulating Complex Hair with Robust Collision Handling” (Choe/Choi/Ko 2005): Detailed description of a hair collision response model using the CG solver method

“Artistic Simulation of Curly Hair” (Pixar technical paper, “Brave”): Very sophisticated hair model for long curly hair (collisions are too much for our purposes, but the bending model is very nice)

“Volumetric Methods for Simulation and Rendering of Hair” (Pixar technical paper, “The Incredibles”): Describes in detail the volumetric approach to hair-hair friction modeling

Categorías: Diseño 3D

FSF and Debian join forces to help free software users find the hardware they need

FSF - Lun, 09/08/2014 - 17:37

While other databases list hardware that is technically compatible with GNU/Linux, h-node lists hardware as compatible only if it does not require any proprietary software or firmware. Information about hardware that flunks this test is also included, so users know what to avoid. The database lists individual components, like WiFi and video cards, as well as complete notebook systems.

The compatibility information comes from users testing hardware on systems running only free software. Previously, h-node site guidelines required they be running one of the FSF's endorsed distributions. While the FSF does not include Debian on this list because the Debian project provides a repository of nonfree software, the FSF does acknowledge that Debian's main repository, which by default is the only place packages come from, is completely free.

"Unlike other common GNU/Linux distributions, installing official Debian by default means installing only free software. As long as Debian users do not add additional package repositories, their systems are a reliable source of fully free compatibility information. We're looking forward to working with Debian to help free software users get the hardware they need, and encourage the companies who provide it," said FSF's executive director John Sullivan.

"By collaborating with h-node, Debian for the first time has the opportunity to join efforts with other free software communities on the assembly of a database of hardware that doesn't require anything outside the Debian main archive to work properly," said Lucas Nussbaum, Debian Project Leader. "Debian is confident that the fruits of this collaboration will result in the largest curated database of Debian-compatible hardware, and invites all Debian community members to contribute hardware compatibility information to h-node."

H-node was started by Antonio Gallo, who continues to be the project's lead developer. The FSF now provides infrastructure and support. The software powering the site is also distributed as free software under version 3 of the GNU General Public License.

Users can contribute either by running one of the FSF's endorsed distributions, or Debian with only packages from the default main archive installed. Developers and translators can contribute by working on the site's code. Information for getting involved is at http://h-node.org/help/page/en/Help.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA. More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Lucas Nussbaum
Debian Project Leader
press@debian.org

Categorías: Software Libre

Free Software Foundation adds libreCMC to its list of endorsed distributions

FSF - Jue, 09/04/2014 - 21:50

The FSF's list consists of ready-to-use full systems whose developers have made a commitment to follow the Guidelines for Free System Distributions. This means each distro includes and steers users toward exclusively free software. All distros reject nonfree software, including firmware "blobs," and nonfree documentation.

The wireless network router is a ubiquitous device found in almost every home or business. Virtually all routers on the market today ship with proprietary operating systems. With libreCMC, users can now replace the proprietary operating system on many routers with a 100% free software operating system.

"Today, if you run libreCMC on your home router, you will gain more control over your computing and over the security of your communications. Over time, as a platform designed for and by free software users, we hope libreCMC will make it easy for any user to run their own services, and to remotely access and share files without having to rely upon third-parties," said Joshua Gay, FSF's licensing and compliance manager.

Bob Call, the founder and lead maintainer of libreCMC, said, "The core goals of the libreCMC project are to provide a solid platform that gives users the freedom to control their computing, both in the embedded and large application spaces and eventually in the area of high-performance computing. Right now, libreCMC supports five different versions of routers, as well as the Ben NanoNote. In the future, we hope to expand support to more devices, provide an easy solution for users to host their own services, and pave the way for free software to expand in the embedded world."

The FSF is currently evaluating routers running libreCMC for its Respects Your Freedom hardware certification program.

More info about libreCMC and how to get involved can be found out at http://librecmc.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

About the GNU Operating System and Linux

Richard Stallman announced in September 1983 the plan to develop a free software Unix-like operating system called GNU. GNU is the only operating system developed specifically for the sake of users' freedom. See https://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html.

In 1992, the essential components of GNU were complete, except for one, the kernel. When in 1992 the kernel Linux was re-released under the GNU GPL, making it free software, the combination of GNU and Linux formed a complete free operating system, which made it possible for the first time to run a PC without non-free software. This combination is the GNU/Linux system. For more explanation, see https://www.gnu.org/gnu/gnu-linux-faq.html.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Bob Call
Founder & Maintainer
LibreCMC
bob@bobcall.me

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Categorías: Software Libre